WEEK 5 REFLECTIONS FROM THE #NEXTERNSHIP INTERNS

Every week we will post a quick roundup of lessons learned during this past week's work by each of our #Nexternship interns. We hope that even though YOU are not able to be Jenny's intern, you can learn through our fearless team! Every week, they answer three of the same questions. SOAK IN THE GOODNESS. Read more about them here.

MARIE WATSCHKE, COMEDY WRITING + LIVE EVENT PRODUCTION 

  1. What made you feel uncomfortable this week and why? What can you do differently next time, if anything?

    I went to an open mic for the first time in months and I was so nervous! The thought of performing after having not gone up for so long was nerve-wracking and the thought of leaving my house and driving was even worse. It wasn't terrible though! There were only a few comics there, but everyone was nice and supportive and I got a few laughs. I was only able to make myself go because Jenny made it an assignment (lol). The only way I'm going to get less nervous about performing is if I keep going out. I'll definitely be going back to that mic next week, so I think that's a good start!
  2. I didn’t know that I didn’t know…

    I haven't built up the marketing side of my career at all. I have a lot of experience and material I want to showcase, but I haven't really made any efforts to make myself marketable. I only found out once Jenny suggested I make a website. Then I realized I don't have headshots, an acting reel, or good social media handles. I'm not very image conscious. I hate having my picture taken and I'm so, so, so bad at letting people know my accomplishments and skills. But, I gotta step it up if I want to work in entertainment!
  3. What else did you learn this week that will be helpful to other people who are interested in pursuing the entertainment industry?

YOU JUST HAVE TO DO IT! Whatever you wanna do, just start doing it! There's so many excuses to not pursue what you want (and a lot of them are valid), but you have to start.

jasmine pak, vIDEO PRODUCTION  

  1. What made you feel uncomfortable this week and why? What can you do differently next time, if anything?
    This week, Jenny took us to a mixer with other Asian Americans in entertainment. I usually do my homework on people attending mixers, but I didn't get the chance to do that this time. When we arrived, Marie and I stuck together to talk to a few people. I can often get stuck networking with one person for longer than necessary, which defeats the purpose of "mixing" at a mixer. I know little techniques to try and maneuver my way to other people, but I felt shy to do it this time. I was intimidated by being surrounded by all these talented people and didn't want to do anything to make me seem like I didn't care. Truth is, I cared a lot. Next time I should trust my instincts and follow the flow of conversations. I'm not the only one there trying to meet other people, so it won't be weird to move around and talk to other people. 

  2. I didn’t know that I didn’t know…
    There's a market price for making videos for clients. Not sure why I never thought about it, but it seems so obvious now that I've heard it mentioned out loud. 

  3. What else did you learn this week that will be helpful to other people who are interested in pursuing the entertainment industry?

Be organized and don't be afraid to ask for help! I did a last minute shoot this week that required a lot of preparation. I thought I could get it all sorted out by myself but ended up needing to ask a friend for help. She was more than willing, and most people are. Just be respectful and remember to communicate clearly. 

 

sophia meng, design+marketing

  1. What made you feel uncomfortable this week and why? What can you do differently next time, if anything?

    I've been thinking a lot about how I view myself as a creative, and it definitely makes me super uncomfortable. I originally made the decision to change my future goals from medicine to the arts, despite having a very STEM-oriented upbringing and viewing "stability" as life's be-all end-all, and this deep-seated fear of uncertainty and failure still constantly manifests itself in how I think about things. I found myself reading article after article about well-known designers and illustrators who say that they never thought they would become successful or wealthy, and only made their art because they loved to do it. I love art but...I can't see myself ever being able to think this way: I worry about financial stability and the possibility of making a livelihood from my art every. single. day. What does that mean for my art? Does this mean I'm not invested enough? If I'm constantly trying to make "successful art," that means I'm not staying true to myself, right?! I'm not sure what I can do differently except continue to create despite these feelings, and trying to fight them as best I can. I'm glad I have this place to spill my insecure artist guts. Stay tuned for more angst!
     
  2. I didn’t know that I didn’t know…

    Life isn't a singular goal you can blindly and tunnel-vision-ly run towards. When I entered college as a pre-med, I dedicated all my energy into intensely fulfilling that goal. As if my dissatisfaction with that path wasn't lesson enough, I currently find myself doing exactly the same thing, even though I've transitioned to pursuing a future in the arts. It's tough to admit that the future is uncertain, but pigeon-holing myself into a specific type of artist or creative does me little to no favors in finding out what truly makes me happy (and I still don't really know...but I have to explore to find out!). I spent the last week or so feeling super disillusioned with myself as a self-proclaimed "graphic design lover" — if I love it so much, why did I feel like I was in such a slump, even though I technically had graphic work to do? But then I drew something and I felt a little better about creating. Basically, don't feel like you need to have or be "one thing" to be super legit. Do shit that makes you feel fulfilled and happy!!!
     
  3. What else did you learn this week that will be helpful to other people who are interested in pursuing the entertainment industry?

    Trust yourself and how you want to express the way you feel and view the world.

 

Claire Zhuang, comedy writing 

  1. What made you feel uncomfortable this week and why? What can you do differently next time, if anything?

    I spent most of this past week trying to understand how I fit in (as an intern) on set, especially when the crew is already a well-oiled machine and have a rhythm and cadence when working. I wanted to observe and learn, but also needed to be out of the way. I didn't want to appear as though I were doing nothing at all, even though much of the time there was nothing for me to do. Someone told me that the best way is to just be attentive and just jump in when the opportunity arose. This was especially difficult as I'm not a very assertive person. Towards the end of the week went much better for me, as they were busier and actually needed more help. I offered help when it was convenient and made sense for me, however, I'm not completely sure if this go-getter attitude is actually welcomed. Everyone seemed to have a role and specific function and if they really needed your help, they'll ask for it.  However, I do feel as though I pushed the boundaries of my own comfort level and am happy to have tried that. I don't believe this will be an issue in the future because if you're called in to day-play on set, they're usually very clear regarding what your role is and what you're expected to do.
     
  2. I didn’t know that I didn’t know…

    Not everyone wants to work above the line! Some people are very happy with their positions on set and are more than happy to tell you about how they got there.
     
  3. What else did you learn this week that will be helpful to other people who are interested in pursuing the entertainment industry?

    There is a pretty rigid hierarchy on set within each particular department. If you're new to a set, don't get too close to the video village (where the directors are set up) and don't get too close to where the actual filming's taking place.

 

 

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